Pindula
Register Login

Mthwakazi Republic Party Says Late VP Nkomo Partly To Blame For Gukurahundi

Mthwakazi Republic Party Says Late VP Nkomo Partly To Blame For Gukurahundi

The Mthwakazi Republic Party (MRP) has said late Vice President Joshua Nkomo is partly to blame for the murder of some 20 000 mainly Ndebele-speaking people during Gukurahundi.

MRP says the massacres could have been avoided if Nkomo had accepted the proposal tabled during the Lancaster House talks of 1979 to split Zimbabwe into two countries.

Late President Robert Mugabe’s North Korean-trained 5th Brigade butchered civilians in the Midlands and Matabeleland provinces under the guise of searching for dissidents between 1983 and 1987.

Speaking at a rally in Khame, Plumtree, MRP president Mqondisi Moyo said the former ZAPU president, Nkomo, refused the offer as he thought he was going to win the country’s first one-man-one-vote election in 1980. NewZimbabwe.com cites him as saying:

I feel sad because we had the opportunity to separate ourselves from Zimbabwe during the Lancaster House talks of 1979 but the late Zapu leader Nkomo refused, he said he wanted the two countries combined because he thought he was going to win not knowing that Mugabe and his colleagues had finished with him.

Three years down the line, Ndebele people started being brutally murdered in the hands of Mugabe. If Nkomo had agreed to that option during the talks, there was not going to be a thing called Gukurahundi.

If only he had not called for a cease-fire in 1982, we were going to defeat Shonas once and for all. I always wonder why Nkomo took his ZPRA troops for training in Russia, Cuba, Algeria and Egypt only call for a cease-fire.

MRP is a political party pushing for reconstitution of the Mthwakazi nation through cessation from the greater Zimbabwe. Mthwakazi is the original Ndebele kingdom.

More: Pindula News is best enjoyed via the App. Download it here

Share Article

Sponsored

More

18 Comments

Jah🇿🇼Tsvarie-07 2 weeks ago

****
****
you can never be leader if you have such attitude...


MuPfungwe Chaiye 2 weeks ago

Pfungwa dzangu dzrikutenderera kuti ndevapi vanhu vanonounganira majokes akadai sure. Baba varikuda kunoongororwa pfungwa dzavo kuvet bcoz ndedzembongoro


Da Truth 2 weeks ago

Moyo wake up from the nightmares you are dreaming I am a Shona by birth.If you say Nkomo was a fool were where you when Nkomo made the blunder.You need help .Nkomo was far much better than Mugabe and these other 🤡 clowns calling themselves politicians.Nkomo is the man an icon in his on class a political Guru.If he was alive Zimbabwe would be a Paradise hates off Nkomo the man . Salute the man.I respect the greatest state man ever to walk Zim soul .Who are you wakabarsira chiii munoniwe bete.?????Pengera kure nesu batai munhu uyo pliz .


Da Truth 2 weeks ago

Nhai varume anofa rini uyooo Moyo ?????

anonymous 2 weeks ago

kkkkk he is just funny.
arikuita zvana pastor mudungwe kind of behaviour


Joe Brownn 2 weeks ago

He is not normal in his senses, he actually needs psychiatric help. The Mthwakazi thing is a nonexistent thing that will never materialize in million years. In fact, listening to his utterances one would conclude he is a vagrant.


Zvimbazi 2 weeks ago

Akafa kaa Nkomo wacho !
Tino blame vanhu vaka madha here?


Sponsored

More
🙄 2 weeks ago

People like this Mutakathi or Mthakazi leader, whatever his name is, make me feel like voting for ED in the coming election vambopedzerwa again.
Pfugwa dzinenge dzokambodonhera mutoilet kwakunhongwa dzikadzoserwa mudzoro kudaro.
Go back to South Africa and fight Zulus who clobbered your ancestors. Nxaaaaa.


JC 2 weeks ago

KKK🤣😂😂 dzisina kugezwa

CAPTAIN WORLD NEWS🌍🌎🌏 2 weeks ago

*📰French election: Macron loses absolute majority in parliament in 'democratic shock'*

French President Emmanuel Macron lost control of the National Assembly in legislative elections on Sunday, a major setback that could throw the country into political paralysis unless he is able to negotiate alliances with other parties.

Macron's centrist Ensemble coalition, which wants to raise the retirement age and further deepen EU integration, was on course to end up with the most seats in Sunday's election.

But they will be well short of the absolute majority needed to control parliament, near-final results showed.

A broad left-wing alliance was set to be the biggest opposition group, while the far-right scored record-high wins and the conservatives were likely to become kingmakers.

Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire called the outcome a "democratic shock" and added that if other blocs did not cooperate, "this would block our capacity to reform and protect the French."

A hung parliament will require a degree of power-sharing and compromises among parties not experienced in France in recent decades.

There is no set script in France for how things will now unfold. The last time a newly elected president failed to get an outright majority in parliamentary elections was in 1988.

"The result is a risk for our country in view of the challenges we have to face," Prime Minister Elisabeth Borne said, while adding that from Monday on, Macron's camp will work to seek alliances.

Macron could eventually call a snap election if legislative gridlock ensues.

"The rout of the presidential party is complete and there is no clear majority in sight," hard-left veteran Jean-Luc Melenchon told cheering supporters.

Leftwing Liberation called the result "a slap" for Macron, and economic daily Les Echos "an earthquake."

ALLIANCES?

United behind Melenchon, leftwing parties were seen on course to triple their score from the last legislative election in 2017.

In another significant change for French politics, far-right leader Marine Le Pen's National Rally party could score a ten-fold increase in MPs with as many as 90-95 seats, initial projections showed. That would be the party's biggest-ever representation in the assembly.

Initial projections by pollsters Ifop, OpinionWay, Elabe and Ipsos showed Macron's Ensemble alliance winning 230-250 seats, the left-wing Nupes alliance securing 141-175 and Les Republicains 60-75.

Macron became in April the first French president in two decades to win a second term, as voters rallied to keep the far-right out of power.

But, seen as out of touch by many voters, he presides over a deeply disenchanted and divided country where support for populist parties on the right and left has surged.

His ability to pursue further reform of the euro zone's second-biggest economy hinges on winning support for his policies from moderates outside his alliance on both the right and left.


chitepo 2 weeks ago

Ari kushura rufu uyu.


Tira 2 weeks ago

If you want your original history go back to south africa where you had been booted out by tshaka and sneaked into zimbabwe as killers ,cattle thiefs ,and also grains


yyy 2 weeks ago

he is an idi.ot we cannot be defeated by those ndebeles they are nothing


Donald Trump 2 weeks ago

Wishful thinking


SC 2 weeks ago

I thought we closed this funny joke called MRP



Leave a comment


Recent News


News Categories



Give us Feedback